SCULPTURE: On & Off the Wall Exhibiting Artists

Emil Alzamora

Emil Alzamora SpacemanBio/Statement:

Emil Alzamora was born in Lima, Peru, and raised in Boca Grande Florida. He graduated Magna Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Florida State University. Alzamora is intrigued by the human figure and the possibilities it holds as both a physical presence and a shell for emotion. He often plays with proportion, creating life-size figures with elongated limbs or exaggerated features. Their forms allude to moments of tension or particular emotions. He exhibits regularly throughout New York, Boston, Maine, and Florida and is a frequent selection for international contemporary art fairs. He currently lives and works in Beacon, NY.

He started his sculpting career in the Hudson Valley working with Polish Art Works as an enlarger in the fall of 1998. Since his departure from P.A.W., he has produced and shown his work throughout New York, Boston, Maine and Florida. He currently live and works in Beacon, NY. The human form has been a constant within his work. He is interested in exploring what I means to inhabit one, often exaggerating or distorting different aspects of the form to reveal an emotional or physical situation, or to tell a story about a predicament or an occurrence. Limitation and potential are as human as the flesh, yet hardly tangible.

Nancy Bowen

Nancy BowenBio:

Nancy Bowen is a mixed media sculptor and an Associate Professor of Art & Design at SUNY Purchase. Using clay, glass, steel, hair and other unusual materials, her work explores metaphors of the body and other organic forms. She has had solo exhibitions throughout the United States and Europe and has won awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, the New York Foundation for the Arts and the European Ceramic Work Center. She received a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and an MFA from Hunter College (CUNY).

Statement:

My work weaves a decorative impulse into physical interpretations of various systems ranging from anatomy to Eastern religion. The pieces look partly familiar because parts are familiar, while the context or format is not. As a sculptor, I exult in the possibilities of form, and attempt to create forms that cannot be easily named or located.

Visual experience for me is uniquely linked to the experience of inhabiting a body and perceiving the world through that vehicle. In this kind of haptic visuality, the eye functions almost as an organ of touch. I am interested in the physicality of the world and how perceptions of that world can be translated into a sculptural experience. Often in my sculpture there exists a body metaphor which is confounded by the material insistence of the elements from which the sculpture is made. The pieces may speak of the contradictions of pleasure and pain, or beauty and horror, and are often mediated by humor which is sometimes perverse. Always they bring the viewer back to an awareness of the ultimate objectness of sculpture.

The form and content of my sculpture are inextricably wed and best express themselves through the use of materials. Materials having a familiar lushness and sensuality, such as human hair or glass, seduce the viewer’s eye into interacting with the sculpture. Once seduced, the viewer then negotiates a more complex interaction with the piece that may evoke memories of a physical experience. The use of tactile materials combined with organic form accentuates the visceral sensuality of the work. Drawing on the visual language of applied arts such as pottery, furniture and other decorative arts, I combine elements of a familiar “lived in” world with the unknown visual world of the internal body. The mixing of anatomical forms with decorative art forms creates a new genus of object- one which is unnamable, a kind of strange/familiar that is difficult to categorize and often difficult to describe with language.


Jo-Ann Brody

Jo-Ann Brody, HuddleBio:

An active and highly-respected member of Westchester’s artistic community, Jo-Ann Brody is a frequently sought-after panelist, exhibitor, and curator. She received her BA from Reed College as well as a Certificate of Study in Sculpture from the Portland Museum Art School.

Statement:

Why do I find these figures, these Incan mummies, so fascinating—the images are powerful, poignant and yet… and, of course, they are actual persons literally pared to the bone, actual people that were carried to all festivals and rites, included even in death.

They represent dreams of the past, seeds for the future. They are memories of my youth, the process of aging, and the voices of my dead.  And carrying one’s dead around—don’t we all. So this is for Pauline, Chaike and Selma; my father and my mother; my ex life; my unborn children; my hopes and dreams distorted by memory. Still precious, carried along, inspiring, in spite of, part and parcel of me.

Figures huddled into themselves, bundled up against their woes. Enduring and patient, suffering, these are the poor after war or famine or other disaster.

Clay inspires me, fascinates me and is an unending source of inspiration. Working with clay evokes a deeply rooted response through the actions of bending it, folding it, smoothing it, making marks in it. The often repetitive figures and torsos I make develop minute variations leading to themes and sub-themes as I explore woman, myself, and the human condition. Women are strong, rooted, connected to the earth, the tree of life, earth mother and mother earth. I work with clay knowing that man was made of clay. Clay is the basic building block of life.


Susan Cox

Susan Cox, MoonlightBio:

Susan Cox has a Master’s degree in Architecture from Columbia University.  After years of practicing architecture, she has turned to glass as a more immediate means of exploring her ideas of light and space. She has studied at Corning, Pilchuck, and North Lands Glass Centre. Her work has been chosen for a number of shows, and is in private collections. 

Statement:

My work is an exploration of how we both perceive and imagine space. As an architect, I designed built spaces. Now I work on a smaller scale, and I conceptualize the experience of inhabiting and moving through a space. Using simple forms and attention to proportion, I strive to create a sense of enclosure, the anticipation of passage, or a suggestion of something beyond. Light, color, and transparency suggest the passage of time, physically and in memory. I want the observer to bring their own experiences and memories to their understanding of these objects.

 
Gordon Fearey

Gordon Fearey, Periodic TableBio:

Gordon Fearey holds a Bachelor of Arts from Yale University and attended Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture.   Fearey’s aim is to engage viewers with the endlessness and existence of their surroundings, a role he sees as one traditionally assigned to religion and mythology. His works have recently been installed along the town of Hastings’s Hudson River front.

Statement:

I make two kinds of constructions – both incorporating weaving – in pursuit of my vision of landscape as a fabric extending infinitely in all directions.  In my reliefs and quasi-paintings, I weave painted strips of sheet aluminum through bicycles. The tortuous process of navigating the spokes and frames while maintaining a minimal warp and weft, determines the three-dimensional shape of the metal fabric. A second group of pieces comprises freestanding shapes recalling sails, mountains, tents, and kayaks. Their purpose is to engage viewers with the endlessness and even the existence of their surroundings, a role traditionally assigned to religion and mythology.  (On website).

In both cases, I establish laws of the weave, such as measurements, patterns, angles, and colors. My challenge is to obey the laws within reason, while assimilating bicycles or sheathing a freestanding shape. Compromises are necessary. I imagine I’m imitating the building blocks of matter, and build the pieces to find out what they look like. 

My pieces are “Made on Earth.” I incorporate bicycles because they represent benign human technology. Clear packing tape on the wheel spokes allows them to turn in the wind. River boulders, historical relics of the planet, serve as ballast.

 
Sarah Haviland 

Sarah Haviland, Wind Within Her NightBio/Statement:

Sarah Haviland’s abstract-figurative sculptures and installations have been exhibited in New York City and nationally in museums and nonprofit spaces, including the Ceres Project Room, Bronx and Queens Museums, Pepsico, and the Hudson River Museum. Her public sculptures have been presented at parks and educational settings in six states, including permanent work at Crittenden Middle School in Armonk and a nine-foot-tall bronze at Grounds for Sculpture in Hamilton, NJ. She has received grants from the Westchester Arts Council, New York and New Jersey State Arts Councils, and the Puffin Foundation, among others. She holds an MFA from Hunter College and a BA from Yale University. Sarah Haviland teaches at Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY, and offers curatorial services and independent lectures.

“Sarah Haviland’s life-size figures are fluid combinations of form and nuance, geometry and gesture. Irving Sandler has described how these quasi-geometric figures exist in multiple realms: ‘Sculpture and painting, volume and plane, the abstract and the figurative, and the organic and the crystal-like are played off against each other.'” –independent curator Kellie Jones

 
Christopher Kaczmarek

Christopher-KaczmarekBio/Statement:

Chris Kaczmarek is an interdisciplinary artist whose work spans both traditional and experimental practices through a broad variety of mediums. His sculptural installations are often interactive and designed to guide the viewer towards a deeper contemplation of the environment that the viewer inhabits, and the passive and active role the viewer plays in their interaction with that environment. His work has been exhibited internationally in venues such as the Wexner Center in Columbus Ohio, the Trinity College Science Gallery in Dublin Ireland, Real Art Ways in Hartford Connecticut and Eyebeam in New York City. He has recently been published as a contributing author for the book A History of Visual Culture which is available from Berg publishers, and has been the recipient of awards such as the New York State Council on the Arts Individual Artist grant and the ArtsWestchester Artist Fellowship.  He has received an MFA in Sculpture and an MA in Modern and Contemporary Art History from Purchase College where he is also currently an adjunct instructor.

Barbara Korman

Barbara Korman, Branch InstallationBio:

Working in New York City and Westchester County, Barbara Korman maintains a studio for the design and production of three dimensional constructions, unique cast bronzes and wood installations. She earned her Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in Fine Arts at the New York State College of Ceramics, Alfred University. Korman’s list of exhibitions is extensive and is indicative of her prominence in the contemporary art world. She has shown as such prestigious institutions as the Neuberger Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art and is frequently included in gallery group and solo shows.

 Statement:

“My Dad was a playful gambler and my Mom a fabulous baker… How could I not become an artist? Having fun taking chances, and making things that are so much more than their ingredients.” This is how Barbara Korman describes her affinity and lifetime involvement with art. Working in New York City and Westchester County, she maintains a studio for the design and production of three dimensional constructions, unique cast bronzes and wood installations. Korman has traveled to every continent in the world, from the National Parks in the United States to the Himalayas in Nepal, collecting regional art and making photographic notations of the land’s textures and formations. In the studio, photographs are tacked to the walls, galvanizing those memories and relationships important to her current work. Her sculptures, both free standing and wall hanging, are created with a variety of materials. Layers of color are added to activate the surfaces and affect the visual movement of the forms. Korman’s award winning works have been exhibited in more than one hundred solo and group shows in leading museums and galleries, including Neuberger Museum of Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Grounds for Sculpture, Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art, Katonah Museum of Art and Tiffany and Company’s Fifth Avenue windows. Today, her sculptures are included in public and private collections throughout the world, including the Neuberger Museum of Art, Phelps Memorial Hospital, and Olivetti-Rome. A graduate of New York City’s High School of Music and Art, Korman has dedicated a large part of her life to education and the development of creative thinking. Named “StyleMaker” by the New York Times and listed in Foremost Woman of the 20th Century and Who’s Who in America, she is a former Board President and current Program Director of the Katonah Museum Artists’ Association.


Martin Kremer

Martin Kremer, LaddersBio:

Working in New York City and Westchester County, Barbara Korman maintains a studio for the design and production of three dimensional constructions, unique cast bronzes and wood installations. She earned her Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in Fine Arts at the New York State College of Ceramics, Alfred University. Korman’s list of exhibitions is extensive and is indicative of her prominence in the contemporary art world. She has shown as such prestigious institutions as the Neuberger Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art and is frequently included in gallery group and solo shows.

 Statement:

“My Dad was a playful gambler and my Mom a fabulous baker… How could I not become an artist? Having fun taking chances, and making things that are so much more than their ingredients.” This is how Barbara Korman describes her affinity and lifetime involvement with art. Working in New York City and Westchester County, she maintains a studio for the design and production of three dimensional constructions, unique cast bronzes and wood installations. Korman has traveled to every continent in the world, from the National Parks in the United States to the Himalayas in Nepal, collecting regional art and making photographic notations of the land’s textures and formations. In the studio, photographs are tacked to the walls, galvanizing those memories and relationships important to her current work. Her sculptures, both free standing and wall hanging, are created with a variety of materials. Layers of color are added to activate the surfaces and affect the visual movement of the forms. Korman’s award winning works have been exhibited in more than one hundred solo and group shows in leading museums and galleries, including Neuberger Museum of Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Grounds for Sculpture, Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art, Katonah Museum of Art and Tiffany and Company’s Fifth Avenue windows. Today, her sculptures are included in public and private collections throughout the world, including the Neuberger Museum of Art, Phelps Memorial Hospital, and Olivetti-Rome. A graduate of New York City’s High School of Music and Art, Korman has dedicated a large part of her life to education and the development of creative thinking. Named “StyleMaker” by the New York Times and listed in Foremost Woman of the 20th Century and Who’s Who in America, she is a former Board President and current Program Director of the Katonah Museum Artists’ Association.


David Licata

David Licata, Red GlassDavid Licata creates delicate, organic glass sculptures that speak to the fragility of life and “the connections and separations we all face.” Incorporating other natural materials, such as driftwood or raw wool, his work goes beyond traditional art glass. A native to White Plains, he hold both a BFA and BS in Art Education from SUNY New Paltz. In 2010 he completed his MFA in Metalsmithing at the Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomfield Hills, MI.

 

 

 

Malcolm MacDougall III

Malcolm MacDougall III, RhizomesBio:

Working in New York City and Westchester County, Barbara Korman maintains a studio for the design and production of three dimensional constructions, unique cast bronzes and wood installations. She earned her Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in Fine Arts at the New York State College of Ceramics, Alfred University. Korman’s list of exhibitions is extensive and is indicative of her prominence in the contemporary art world. She has shown as such prestigious institutions as the Neuberger Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art and is frequently included in gallery group and solo shows.

 Statement:

“My Dad was a playful gambler and my Mom a fabulous baker… How could I not become an artist? Having fun taking chances, and making things that are so much more than their ingredients.” This is how Barbara Korman describes her affinity and lifetime involvement with art. Working in New York City and Westchester County, she maintains a studio for the design and production of three dimensional constructions, unique cast bronzes and wood installations. Korman has traveled to every continent in the world, from the National Parks in the United States to the Himalayas in Nepal, collecting regional art and making photographic notations of the land’s textures and formations. In the studio, photographs are tacked to the walls, galvanizing those memories and relationships important to her current work. Her sculptures, both free standing and wall hanging, are created with a variety of materials. Layers of color are added to activate the surfaces and affect the visual movement of the forms. Korman’s award winning works have been exhibited in more than one hundred solo and group shows in leading museums and galleries, including Neuberger Museum of Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Grounds for Sculpture, Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art, Katonah Museum of Art and Tiffany and Company’s Fifth Avenue windows. Today, her sculptures are included in public and private collections throughout the world, including the Neuberger Museum of Art, Phelps Memorial Hospital, and Olivetti-Rome. A graduate of New York City’s High School of Music and Art, Korman has dedicated a large part of her life to education and the development of creative thinking. Named “StyleMaker” by the New York Times and listed in Foremost Woman of the 20th Century and Who’s Who in America, she is a former Board President and current Program Director of the Katonah Museum Artists’ Association.

 

Clare Maker

Clare Maker, ManifoldBio:

Clare Maker graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Eastern Michigan University.   Using found objects, she constructs whimsical characters inspired by form.    She has been working as a sculptor for almost 10 years and has recently shifted her creative efforts towards computer graphics and design. 

Statement:

“My sculptures are mostly about the form and how the objects take up space.  They don’t necessarily have subject matters; they just have to occupy space in an interesting way.”

 
Susan Manspeizer

Manspeizer, The Living ShellBio:

Susan Manspeizer’s career spans 30 years of prestigious exhibitions, including numerous awards and review. She has exhibited extensively throughout New York, the Northeast and the Midwest, with an international exhibit in Tokyo, Japan. Manspeizer held her first museum show at the Midland Center for the Arts, in Midland, Michigan, in the summer of 2002. Her sculpture, A Symphony, was awarded an honorable mention in the Best of New York Artists, publication, 2006. She has studied Art at the Art Students League, where she currently teaches a summer session, and teaches Drawing & Painting course throughout the year at The Art Center of Northern New Jersey.

Statement:

The most expressive element of art, for me, is the line. It is a powerful tool. It can be used to express sensitivity or it can be employed to show enormous energy and in-between it has the ability to express a magnitude of emotions. Coupled with color, I have set out on a mission to demonstrate the use of a dimensional line in space. Throughout the last thirty years, my concerns have been to paint the gesture of this line or stroke in space. Traditionally, a painted stroke using a brush and canvas was on a two-dimensional surface, but I have taken this concept and brought it out into the three dimensions, or our space. Wood and paint have become the vehicles, which best express, my content. My content is one that shows the multiple layers of feelings which we experience daily. Whether they are uplifting, fragile, celebratory, cautious or energized, we as humans are continually balancing our emotions, in our everyday life. The gesture of my strokes captures the emotional qualities of life. The imagery that I create includes both the positive and the negative areas; namely the space around and between my works is of primary importance.

Regardless of one’s own spoken language, my personal visual language of life’s emotions can be understood by all, through dialogue and reflection.

  
Steven Millar

Steven Millar, Suburban Archive 1Bio:

Steven Millar is “drawn to landscapes that are rife with paradoxes: promises and failures, utopian desires and complicated realities.” Whether invoking urban or suburban landscapes, Mr. Millar consistently explores ideas of home and the collision between the natural and built environments. He graduated Summa Cum Laude with a BA in Art and English from Yale University and holds an MFA in Painting from Washington University, St. Louis.

Statement:

Drawing upon memory and research, my work explores particular sites in the built environment. I distill and recreate these places, exploring architecture, nature, structure, and design. The final forms of my work include model-like sculptures, large public constructions, installations, and works on paper.

In many of my pieces, simple blocks simulate housing units and, with a shifting sense of scale, suggest rooms, buildings, or entire neighborhoods. Whether I present urban or suburban locations, certain themes have remained constant: the complicated intersection of the built world, society, and nature, ideas of home and community, and the collisions of development. My art ultimately probes the relationship between particular spaces and individual identity, how we inhabit a space and how a space inhabits us.


Mari Ogihara

Mari Ogihara, PlankBio/Statement:

Mari Ogihara is a ceramic sculptor based in White Plains, New York. She was born in Japan but grew up in Michigan most of her life. After receiving a BFA from the University of Michigan in 2003, she went on to study in Kyoto, Japan to experience ceramics in her native country. Upon her return she attended Temple University of Philadelphia to receive her MFA in 2006. During her studies at Temple, Ogihara traveled to Southeast Asia and studied abroad to Gujarat, India. Traveling and experiencing new culture inspires her work. She admires the temples and cathedrals in each country, especially the figurative architectural follies that decorate their exterior. Ogihara has completed several ceramic residencies including a year at the Clay Art Center in Port Chester, New York, and at AIR Vallauris in France in summer 2008. Her work can be viewed in national and international exhibitions. Ogihara will travel to Brazil in summer 2011 to Instituto Sacatar where she has been awarded a fellowship to continue her ceramics research.

Daan Padmos

Daan Padmos, Skid Row no. 12Bio/ Statement:

Daan Padmos was born in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. He studied sculpture at the Academie voor Beeldende Kunst in Rotterdam. In 2009 he was in the show “Double Dutch”. His sculpture “Time Sharing,” is permanently installed at the Hudson waterfront in Peekskill, New York, which was featured and reviewed in The New York Times. Daan is currently working on a series of steel “shelters” called “Skid Row.” Like much of his work, the series is inspired by his travels throughout the world, the work of John Steinbeck and the present-day experience of many Americans.

 

Barbara Segal

Barbara Segal, 50's Onyx Striped DressBio:

Barbara Segal attended Pratt Institute of Technology for her Bachelor and Master Degrees. She also studied at L’Ecole Nationale Superieure des Beaux Arts in Paris, France. In addition to contributing to various public arts projects in New York City and Yonkers, she has received numerous grants and awards, including the 2008 Year in Review Award from the Americans for the Arts Public Art Network. Segal’s work comes from peering into her mother’s dressing room, where her eyes fell upon the satin, lace and gemstones. She felt she could make clothing out of stone, the clothing that she had seen as a child. In her latest series, Little Girl’s Dresses, light plays a critical role. By choosing translucent stones and carving delicate layers of lace and fabric, light passes through transforming a simple child’s dress into a lush, sensual memory. Segal is in various permanent collections around the country, including the White House Collection and the Neuberger Museum.

Statement:

Remembering my mother posing in an elegant white dress, and my father-handsome and larger than life sitting for their portraits. Viewing the portrait of the children dressed in finery – puffy sleeves, lace collars and full skirts.
In 1972, I flew off to live in Paris. Our lives had changed. My father had died.
Living in Europe was a fantasy. Exploring caves of 12th century abbeys, filled with hand painted wood and stone statues. Driving wildly through the limestone quarries in the south of France. Living in the mountains of Carrara and learning to carve from the best artisans in the world. My eyes were opened by beauty.

Returning to the States, I felt I could make clothing out of stone, the clothing I had seen as a child, constructed like the Duomo with the sensuality of the Baroque artists.

Having viewed architectural masterpieces in Europe, I selected stones that incorporated beautiful color and texture. I was able to create clothing with many different personality traits: sexy, childlike, sports-like, iconographic as well as the mundane. I was empowered!
In my latest series, Little Girl’s Dresses, light plays a critical role. By choosing translucent stones and carving delicate layers of lace and fabric, light passes through transforming a simple child’s dress into a lush, sensual memory.
 

B. Avery Syrig

B. Avery Syrig, Harsh ElementsBio:

B. Avery Syrig received her BFA in 2010 from Alfred University, where she also studied Art History. Syrig She has been selected for the ArtSlant Prize, a Showcase Series designed to exhibit and promote talented artists from around the world. Recent exhibition highlights include solo-shows at the Sculpture Gallery in Alfred, NY, and group shows with Kenise Barnes Fine Art and the Bronx Art Space.

Statement:

My work speaks about the forces in modern culture – which I call form for living—that paradoxically both bind and shape our experience with other people. These forms for living are designated without our individual input, giving us both boundaries that hinder and structures to grow from. Within this web of societal demands, personal dreams, and the needs of reality; stressful tensions and beautiful predicaments are found. The taming and weaving together of these opposing forces seems to be a critical step and constant feat within a person’s life. Natural materials, more akin to skin and hair, depict the intimate mark these forces have on the development and care of the self. Through all of my work, my hope is that viewers can bring their own experiences to understand its emotional dimensions without the simplification of the written word.


Craig Usher

Craig UsherBio:

Craig Usher graduated from SUNY Purchase School of Art & Design with a BFA.  Sculpting is one way for an individual to make a mark, and counter the immense alienation of existence. He sees his past work as metaphorically figurative and is interested in the blending of progressive and traditional sculpture

Statement:

I seek to discover meaning through the making of sculpture. It is a way to make sense of or to question my reality. Like a hunter who waits quietly for life in the forest to show itself, I seek what the piece is saying and then respond intuitively. I do not know what it is or where, only that I am on the way, like taking a Sunday drive. One just feels out which road to take.

I have a deep respect for classical sculpture, and have recently moved from working with large scale steel abstractions to more traditional subjects such as portraits. I feel that the way to understand where to go, is somehow found by reconnecting with the past. What artists have done for thousands of years has a reason and makes sense. In retrospect, I see my past work as metaphorically figurative. I am interested in the blending of progressive and traditional sculpture. Sculpture is a kind of vessel reflecting the self, which continues to communicate information beyond the work of the maker. This idea of transcendence is a powerful inspiration; one can move beyond one’s self to connect with others. It is in this way that I am moved to struggle. Sculpting is one way for an individual to make a mark, and counter the immense alienation of existence.

 
Eric Wildrick

Eric-Wildrick, StarsBio:

Eric is an accomplished sculptor whose preferred medium is “found objects,” particularly old hand tools which he imaginatively reshapes and/or combines with other tools to form dynamic spatial art. Eric Wildrick has worked as the Sculpture Technician, a professional staff position in the School of Art & Design, since he began his service at Purchase College in 1978. He received his BFA from the Kansas City Art Institute, attended the Johnson Atelier and Technical Institute of Sculpture, and completed his MFA at SUNY, New Paltz.

Statement:

Found tools provide me with clues for form making. The intended use, shape, age and color / patina of the tool inform my sculpture making process. My sculptures are small monuments to those whose hands have worked with those tools that are incorporated in the sculptures. The reference to “hands” is a powerful one for me as I am deeply moved by the connections I imagine these hands must have had with those tools I have chosen to work with.

I am an educator and sculptor who lives in White Plains, N.Y.  I work in the sculpture department at Purchase College.

 

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