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Music Conservatory of Westchester Announces Colors of Music – Student Mural Contest, Public Art Opportunity for Westchester Students

Music Conservatory of Westchester Announces Colors of Music Student Mural Contest

Public Art Opportunity for Westchester County Students

White Plains, NY – Calling all Westchester County aspiring teen artists! The Music Conservatory of Westchester is announcing the launch of the Colors of Music Student Mural Contest with a search for talented local students to share their artistry on a public canvas, and collaborate with an experienced professional in a mural representing the theme of “Multi-Cultural Music.” Starting Tuesday, March 20, 2018, the Conservatory’s Colors of Music Student Mural Contest invites students in grades 7-12 residing in Westchester County, NY to submit their original design representing the theme.

The Colors of Music Student Mural Contest is made possible by a Challenge America grant from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). The Conservatory is honored to be a recipient in this nationally competitive award program.

One winner and three runners up will be selected by a panel of art experts from Westchester and New York City. The winner will collaborate with mural artist Jonathan Villoch to create the final mural design. All four original student designs will be incorporated into the mural as well as displayed inside the Conservatory building. Reflecting the welcoming, inclusive, and vibrant essence of the community music school, the Colors of Music Student Mural Contest gives visual presence to the sounds of music, and encourages students of all backgrounds to share their creativity with the community.

This opportunity is open to all eligible residents of Westchester County, and current students of the Music Conservatory of Westchester. Entrants must currently be in grades 7-12. Contest entries must be submitted between Monday, March 19 and Friday, May 11, 2018. Original art submissions will show the student’s interpretation of “Multi-Cultural Music” using a variety of mixed media of the student’s choice. Copyrighted material or images of celebrities will not be allowed. The Conservatory asks that students limit artwork to images of family friendly subject matter.

A judging panel of art experts, including Janet Langsam, CEO of Arts Westchester, Lynn Honeysett, Executive Director of the Pelham Art Center, Samantha De Tillio, Assistant Curator, Museum of Arts and Design, Margaret Adasko, Curator of Education, Katonah Museum of Art, and the mural artist will make selections in two rounds: Round 1 will be a digital submission round accepted via email. If chosen for Round 2, the original artwork must be mailed or dropped off at the Music Conservatory of Westchester to be considered for winning the contest.

Student entrants must complete and send a submission form signed by their parents and a digital copy of their artwork to [email protected].

For more information about the contest guidelines and to complete the submission form, visit: www.musicconservatory.org/colorsofmusiccontest

Winners will be announced Friday, June 15, 2018 with a final unveiling celebration to be held on Sunday, September 30, 2018 in which all contestants and their families will be invited to attend.

For more information about this contest and/or the Music Conservatory of Westchester, please contact Adriana Rivera, Communications and Development Assistant, at [email protected] or 914-761-3900 x135.

The Music Conservatory of Westchester was founded in 1929 by a group of community members and renowned artists. Today, the Conservatory provides the extraordinary benefits of music to all in our community, from absolute beginners to advanced artists, with one-on-one instruction, performing ensembles, theory, composition, early childhood classes, lifelong learning for adults, and free community performances, serving 2,900 students each year from 4 months to over 80 years old. As a not-for-profit organization, the Conservatory is dedicated to serving the community and reaching out to those who would not otherwise have access. Our Scholarship Program provides tuition assistance for financially deserving students. The Music Therapy Institute brings music into the lives of 1,900 children and adults with disabilities each year through on-site and outreach programs. Healing Our Heroes offers military veterans a specialized music therapy program to help with recovery after their service. The Conservatory has inspired generations of students, and contributed to a vibrant musical life in the county, the region, and beyond.

About the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA)

Established by Congress in 1965, the NEA is the independent federal agency whose funding and support gives Americans the opportunity to participate in the arts, exercise their imaginations, and develop their creative capacities. Through partnerships with state arts agencies, local leaders, other federal agencies, and the philanthropic sector, the NEA supports arts learning, affirms and celebrates America’s rich and diverse cultural heritage, and extends its work to promote equal access to the arts in every community across America. Visit arts.gov to learn more about NEA.

About the Artist, Jonathan Villoch

Jonathan Villoch is a Cuban-American artist originally from Miami Beach, Florida. Jonathan’s earliest influences were the colors, shapes and textures his Cuban grandmother used to create patterns for dresses. Mr. Villoch earned a B.A. in Studio Art and a M.S. in Education from Lehman College. He has created acclaimed wall murals and art installations around the country. Additionally, his work has been exhibited at the Rush Philanthropic Arts Foundation, Frederico Seve Gallery, and Allegra
LaViola Gallery in New
York City; for The Bakehouse in Miami; and at Aisle One Gallery in St. Louis. He is a high school art teacher in Brooklyn public schools, working with under-privileged and disenfranchised youth. He has curated an art exhibition with Variety the Children’s Charity featuring the work of homeless LGBTQ teens; created a large mural with children on the autism spectrum for AHRC; and recently served as a judge in a borough-wide student art competition organized by the New York City Department of Education’s Office of Arts and Special Projects.

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